Top Social

Grades Do Not Define You

Monday, March 21, 2016
It would seem that the primary basis of one's capabilities in school is one's grade. Teachers commend their students who ace all of their tests, showering them with words such as "smart", "diligent" and "intellectual". Those who fail to receive perfect grades, on the other hand, are pressured by others to achieve more, to get higher grades, and to succeed. 

School has always been like a bank full of grades. The bigger grades you get, the "richer" you seem to be, intellectually. It would then seem like your future can be determined by how well you pass an exam. However, that isn't the case. Grades are merely reflections of your efforts in class, not necessarily reflections of your total abilities.

A student can ace an exam but still have no genuine knowledge in their head. Memorization is one of the keys to passing exams, but what can memorization even offer if you do not even understand the concepts of what you are memorizing? A true test of understanding and intelligence deals with the understanding of ideas. Intelligence cannot be based on only one's skill to memorize.

A student can fail in class, yet excel in others. Not everyone can be masters of all fields, but that does not make them any less valuable. You might have difficulties in Foreign Languages but your inclination might lean toward the sciences. 

A student can be known as the frequent-failer, but outside the classroom, he is confident, passionate, and competent. He is responsible and does well in extra-curricular activities. Surely his grades cannot define him when he has clearly shown his potential to the world.

A student can fail today yet succeed tomorrow. Grades are based on some silly things like attendance, participation, etc. The circumstances now may not allow him to bask in the spotlight, but after school when he is out in the real world, he can achieve anything, if he has the determination.

If your grades are unsatisfactory, hold your head up high. They are not the only things that can define you. A good character, responsible attitude, and unique understanding of things can separate you from the rest of the people who have grade-based mindsets. 

Grades might be the key to opportunity when applying for jobs, but after that, it's all up to you. It's up to your mind and heart to continue to learn and to grow. I know I said that grades do not define you, but please, keep studying. Grades may not define you, but a lazy, incompetent, and sloppy attitude definitely will.

7 comments on "Grades Do Not Define You"
  1. Hi guys! What are your thoughts on grades? Comment below. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. This post made me feel better after reading it. Lately, I've been stressing myself to study hard to achieve the grades that I want but in the end It's not what I always expected. Hehe but I know na kahit hindi ako magaling sa ganon na mga bagay, magaling naman ako sa ibang bagay.(not the bad things though. Haha)

    I do agree that 'Grades don't define you' but of course we need to study well to get good grades that would make our parents proud. Sayang naman kasi ng pera ng magulang natin if hindi tayo mag-aral mabuti diba~ :D

    I know some people who excels in class but when it comes to the outside world they seem..... lost (????) Idk if it's just me, I'm not judging them though. Hehehe

    KTEL | www.kabelgera.tumblr.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Ktel! I'm glad it made you feel better, hehe. And yes, it's always important not to take things for granted. (Nice to meet you, by the way! Always a great thing to meet other Pinoy bloggers) x

      Delete
  3. I agree completely. I've always gotten great grades (not perfect ones, but great ones) due to my terrifyingly large short-term memory capacity. I cram for everything, do better than most people, and flush my short-term memory immediately after. Very few things go to long-term memory. I'm not actually learning. We're not learning every subject- some subjects we're just learning how to take tests. We're learning the best way to succeed in the system. I consider myself a successful person anyway, because it's not just my memory that makes me appear intelligent, although it certainly helps in a lot of areas. I'm not particularly good at socializing but I am great at working independently to achieve big and unusual goals (e.g. having a successful blog, launching a freelance editing business and a popular online craft shop). My grades have nothing to do with that. That's why I'm not stressing out about school at all and not trying to get the perfect grade. I can always do better, but I'm not feeling the need to. It also helps that you don't need a degree in English to get a job in the publishing industry, although it helps. I'm not a huge fan of the school system, but I guess they have to try to measure our intelligence in some sort of way, and it's the best they've got so far.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Alicia. Ugh, short-term memory can be the worst! I completely agree with what you said about learning to succeed in the system. Sucks that it still has to be this way, right? x

      Delete
  4. Thanks for this inspiring post. Growing up grade-conscious is a nightmare and a bit unhealthy when dealing with failures. I used to get so depressed and would be ashamed of myself whenever I failed a test.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy to know that you liked this post. I used to feel that way too but now I'm not sure if this "whatever" attitude is even a good thing.

      Delete

Comments make me happy! <3